Tag Archives: Red

100 Chicken Names

  1. Gertie
  2. Heimlich
  3. Carbuncle
  4. Alfred Hitchbock
  5. Zebulon
  6. Erlenmeyer
  7. Orson
  8. Pietro
  9. Mortimer
  10. Dortimer
  11. Gortimer
  12. Commander Sulu
  13. La Llorona
  14. Robert Bockenheimer
  15. Vorhees
  16. Calusari
  17. Dongle
  18. Featherbreath
  19. Mustafa
  20. Salieri
  21. Kjuklinger

  22. Oilasco

  23. Yuki-onna

  24. Cluck Bruckman / Clyde Bockman

  25. Nonono

  26. Nanana

  27. Hephasteus

  28. Somorost

  29. Vanderbleit

  30. Adarna

  31. Alkenost
  32. Kharkatak
  33. Hoodwink
  34. Wingmar Bergman / Ingmar Birdman
  35. 1973 New York Mining Disaster
  36. Kaddish
  37. Chicory
  38. Ballyhoo
  39. Vuvuzela
  40. Corsica
  41. Calliban
  42. Tyblat
  43. Gillygaloo
  44. Heny Lamarr
  45. Sampson
  46. Prometheus
  47. Nausicaa
  48. Moebius
  49. Escher
  50. Asher
  51. Wexler
  52. Winkler
  53. Baku
  54. Jackson Pollo
  55. Kura
  56. Arcadia
  57. Oberon
  58. Titania
  59. Hellion
  60. Cronos
  61. Roc
  62. Ziz
  63. Fenghuang
  64. Frida Clucko
  65. Yoruba
  66. Goldberg
  67. Apollo
  68. Beagle
  69. Joan of Arc
  70. Stella
  71. Klondike
  72. Usurper
  73. Grootslang
  74. Pearl S. Cluck
  75. Mastroianni
  76. Empendocles
  77. Marcello
  78. Azaroth
  79. Mercury
  80. Banquo
  81. Claudius
  82. Ophelia
  83. Basilisk
  84. Barbu Stanwick
  85. Vincent Gallo
  86. Audrey
  87. Paul F. Tompkins
  88. Ichabod
  89. Fyodor
  90. Ursula
  91. Mycroft
  92. Fermat
  93. Tengu
  94. Henry Houdani
  95. Irving
  96. The Were-Monster
  97. Vonnegut
  98. Ada Lovelace
  99. Mary Shelley
  100. Curiosity

Cat Eats Noodles

Some may say I have an obsession with noodles. Others may say I have an obsession with cats.  I say it’s only a problem if it gets in my way.  This piece comes from my Sophomore year of College, before all hell broke loose, where the task was to take the feeling of a piece of stock music given to us and assemble together something using stock footage.  Besides the noodles I shot, I was able to mostly communicate everything through editing and color.  Well, maybe. Let’s take a look:

Cat Eats Noodles from Vvinni Gagnepain on Vimeo.

Yes. Yes I was able to capture the feeling of the stock music.  What strikes me most now looking back at this piece some five years after making it is how well this acts as a trailer for a movie that will never exist, nor should it as we already know exactly how the movie will go thanks to the music choice, editing, typography, color, in short thanks to everything.  We know there is a cat. The cat is suspicious. And somehow the cat stumbles into a world of murder and intrigue involving noodles.  Cat Eats Noodles: Coming to theaters July 2016.

“Space Laser” best photos 9-N-4!

As we’re all aware, I was recently back in Sioux City Iowa at the Western Iowa Technical Community College to make a movie (Much like I did last year when we made “Write-In 2012“).  This time we shot a short sci-fi piece about Trash and Spiders and Laser beams.  It was a lot of fun, and it’ll take a while to get everything edited together.  In the meantime, though, here are some stills from set to quell the curiosity that would otherwise consume and kill you.

Featuring Jim Westcott as "Space Demon" Mangus DeTriade!

Chris Risdall, Camera Assistant

Fun Fact about shooting this film was that we shot in the server room at WITCC, which means that all of the wires that are going in and out of the shots are actually all of the internet for the entire school!  It was an exciting location that proved to be a bit tricky to block in (I had only seen photos of it before getting onto set, and the room was simultaneously bigger and smaller than I had thought) and we had to have a member of the IT department watching us the entire time to make sure we didn’t unplug anything.

Jason Lees in Cinema 19N4!

Front projection of a ship computer in 19N4!

I was also glad to finally work with the immortal Jim Westcott for this project.  If any of you have seen the work of Andrew Gingerich you’d most know Jim as Roger Deerborn in “Third Party ’08”, but he’s also been on the sets of “A Serious Man”. “Sweet Land”, and many independent features in the Minneapolis area.  Jim was a pleasure to work with, as were our other two actors Matthew Hubert and Aundrea Marcoe.

Matt Hubert and Aundrea Marcoe as Skarsgaard and Steelpepper, respectively

The Immortal Jim Westcott

VATAS: Ebicyd 13

Finally, an episode that delivers on a promise made in the very first VATAS: This is an episode about bicycles.  It’s not one of the most important episodes, it’s not revolutionary, but I like it. But what about you? Will YOU like it?

 

Ebicyd 13 on YouTube

As I said above, I like this episode.  It has a meandering feel that never makes it too long, and there are some great shots of bicycle gears and valves (although by the end of the episode everything is pink, and I certainly could have done a better job rigging the camera to the bicycle to  get a clearer shot of riding.  Ebicyd 13 is in many ways the end of VATAS proper, and I feel that it’s a good episode and a strong marker for slightly above the middle of the road.  It occupies a similar space as Number 5 did, but it significantly improves on the formula, and although the titles don’t feel necessary in the episode they also don’t feel all that intrusive.

Even though VATAS proper is more or less over, there are still three more special episodes left.  So look out for those!

VATAS: 1dspEioe0

I wanted to do something special for Episode Number 10, and I also had been wanting to begin exploring new ways to put together a VATAS episode that broke the mold of what we had seen.  So I decided that this would be my experimental episode, and that I would use the previous ten episodes as a building block and experiment further with Final Cut to create something that could function both as an episode of VATAS and an experimental tribute to it (Also, despite the success of VATAS as a whole, these episodes did help me become more comfortable with editing and really forced me to understand and utilize the software I had).  This is also the last of the “Big Three” episodes of VATAS (which, for clarification, they’re named the “Big Three” because they’re not only some the most seen episodes, but I feel they also capture the series at its best), so let’s enjoy it, shall we?

1dspEio0 on YouTube

This isn’t my best experimental work.  In fact, I’d put it pretty low on the list.  But, I think we hit a nice fever pitch by the end of the episode, and it’s a nice way of looking back at VATAS.  But looking back at this episode now, I’d say that I didn’t go far enough.  The episode still follows the same formula as most of the episodes, and although that’s an interesting choice I feel like 10 could have benefited greatly from being complete visual chaos.  I feel like if I took more risks (like I did closer to the end of the episode with the frame-by-frame cuts and the overlaying of “Hello”) then this episode would have been a stellar installment in my experimental line, but as it stands it’s merely one of the better episodes of my unsuccessful video blog series.  Although, it’s also important to note that this was really my first venture into purely experimental territory, with the closest thing prior to this being “Hallway Is“, which is terrible and no one should watch it.

VVVV: A Non-retrospective

As the seven previous readers know, there was a point during my senior year that I thought I would have a retrospective showing of the work I made throughout college.  This retrospective never happened, which is a bit unfortunate, but I still have these posters advertising it which I designed.  Let’s take a look at how they grew and evolved over time, shall we?

I knew that I wanted to include the manic sensibility inherent in all of my films, and I knew the title of my retrospective: VVVV. So, I started out just by exploring the V form and figuring out how to include it in with selected images from each of my films.  Here’s what I started with:

A rather plain poster with a Lawn Ornament

A much more dynamic poster with V's

So the later poster was much more dynamic and interesting: It does more with type and uses it in an interesting and formative fashion, and the varying degrees of size and color (as well as the difference between the photo and the type) help pull the viewer in.  But it was still too busy, and it was still missing something.  So, I spoke with some fellow designers, put on my thinking cap, and came up with these:

Simpler but still interesting, with the Lawn Ornament

What would become the final for Powerful Magics

This last design is what became the “official” design for the VVVV poster, as shortly after designing this one I found out that the senior retrospective wouldn’t be happening.  So, there are still a few steps missing to make this into a really great poster series, but there are still a few good gems in here:

The final Puma design of the Poster

A Ward poster that needs some help.

Teh Cld Wr

Here’s another old Henceforth Classic, from my high-school/basement days: Teh Cld Wr.  Although, interesting fact, Teh Cld Wr (though shot my senior year of High School in 2007) wasn’t completed until I was in my second semester of College (winter of 2008).  Another interesting fact: Teh Cld Wr was the first film that I’m credited as directing on my IMdB Page (the film that got me my IMdB page was Andrew Gingrich’s Wholesale Souls, though).  So, Teh Cld Wr occupies an interesting place in the Henceforth mythology and chronology: A bridge between the years I discovered my craft and the years I honed it, and for the longest time throughout college I was known for making Teh Cld Wr.  That’s the preamble and history for the video, so now let’s take a look at the film itself:

Teh Cld Wr from Vvinni Gagnepain on Vimeo.

The early henceforth films were plagued by a number of problems, many of which are found in every film people have made with their friends in basements: Sound quality, a lack of expertise in editing, general low-quality.  So these are given problems, and even among those the only glaring issue is the sound (I was rather ambitious with editing, and I do think it’s a notch above most of the other films that my fellow high-schoolers were making).  The early henceforth films can also be marked as having a bizarre grasp on color correction.  Part of this was intentional, as was the choppy nature of the film, but even so… it gets a bit tiresome.  Also, because of the choppy nature of the project, many of the best gags are cut out (and because of general disorganization, an entire segment on the Vietnam War was cut out.  Oddly enough, the Vietnam War segment was the reason I decided to make this project).

But there are also some good nuggets in here, and I don’t think it’s completely a waste like some of the other early films are.  The part about the arms race (1 apple, 2 apples, don’t use the apples) is still one of my favorite scenes ever, as is the part regarding the Berlin Wall (“I can’t until the late 80’s” is a gem).  I also think the acting is remarkably decent, given how old we were and how little experience I had with directing.  So, although this isn’t my best work, and I’ve grown by leaps and bounds since the creation of this (or at least I’ve gotten better at hiding my mistakes) this will forever be attached to me and for a good amount of people it will be the earliest film of mine they can see.  And I think it’s a fantastic film for that purpose.

VATAS: Essisode 5

Number 5 isn’t quite the chaotic scatter that 4 or many future episodes are, but it’s still not quite as slogging as, say, Number 2 was.  We skipped over a lot of the summer where I shot Tracy McKnightly (which essentially made The Tracy McKnightly hour pointless), but I figured I should include one other summer video before heading into the next semester.  Essisode 5 also became one of the last VATAS for a few months back in 2008 as I dealt with website transfers and my Sophomore semester at CSF, and… and some other things.  So, let’s look at this strange middle entry:

VATAS 5 on YouTube

Essisode 5 was made out of a combination of boredom and necessity, and that combines to create an episode that is essentially about nothing.  We don’t get any new information on Tracy McKnightly, we don’t find out anything about the upcoming school semester, and a sizable chunk is made up of a discussion on Angel Meat.  But it’s much more tolerable than some of the earlier entries, and I think that there are some fantastic little nuggets throughout the piece: The Angel Meat monologue is nice, the Lobster dance, even “The Tie is FAKE!” is a nice part (although “The Pickles are Okay” had a greater impact).  I also think that this episode is an interesting window into the pre-school doldrums and where I was creatively at that point: 5 is exactly as a VATAS episode should have been, but there was no meat to it.  It’s essentially following a formula, but it doesn’t really understand WHY it is.  It’s a bored piece that was made because something had to be made. It’s what’s done after a year of film school, and it’s mostly pointless.

Stay tuned for Number Six, which comes some four months later. Or, you can just watch it on the VATAS VIMEO.  It’s up to you. Also: I’m aware that the drawing looks nothing like the actual Kurt Vonnegut.

Pig Death Machine

Recently the Chicago Underground Film Festival was put on at the Logan theater, and among other things the newest film by Underground Low-Fi filmmaker Jon Moritsugu premiered titled “Pig Death Machine”.  This film, as well as his near 11 other underground films, won him the Lifetime achievement award (which is well deserved, and I suggest you all check out his work.  It’s bizarre, and the type of wonderfully insane and low-fi work that can only come out of an extreme love for the craft of filmmaking).  But why bring this up?  Because I was the art director for “Pig Death Machine”. And This is my Story.

Pig Death Machine on YouTube

It was the summer of 2010.  I was just about to begin my senior year of college and I was planning on taking a trip back to Colorado to see friends and the like before beginning. Then I got a call from the internship director at CSF/SFUAD who told me that Jon would be making his next film (which came after nearly a decade away from filmmaking) in Santa Fe and he was looking for an art director.  I decided to give it a chance and read the script, after all I wanted more work in the art department, and the idea that I would be the art director on a feature film instead of a mere intern was enticing.

Once I read the script, I knew I had to do it.  It’s a nutso piece about raw pork, and plants, and people going insane from eating raw pork and looking at plants, and if you know two cents about me you know this is right up my alley.

Vvinni on the Set of Pig Death Machine
Another plus was that I got to make fake cocaine. A LOT of fake cocaine.

The biggest part of being the art director on Pig Death Machine was figuring out how to make the raw pork that the protagonists eat to get higher IQ levels.  The problem was not only in making edible and gross-looking raw pork, but it also had to be completely vegetarian.  After a bit of thinking I came to a solution: Seitan. After some tests with my art department, we figured out that Seitan actually takes food dye rather well and when suspended in red juice looks an awful lot like chunks of gross, bloody meat. This was FANTASTIC news!

A still from the film "Pig Death Machine"
This is actually a cut of raw bloody fake meat, I thought I had some chunks but I can’t seem to find them anymore.
This girl does NOT like lettuce!
Another still: This one of a woman who begins to hear plants talk and this head of lettuce SCREAM!
Behind the scenes on the set of Pig Death Machine
Behind the scenes in a greenhouse showdown location.

Some of the other set decoration I had to do was create the living space for a woman who likes plants more than people, turn a dog washing clinic into a meat warehouse (I don’t have any stills from that, unfortunately, but let’s just say we used a lot of boxes), and create an Old Mexican drug haven in most exploitative way I could (if you ever get a chance to see the film, keep your eyes peeled for a cactus taped to the walls).  Finally, I also had the chance to create the brand identity of the meat supplier who looses this horrific raw hell unto the world. This was The Meat Center:

The fake logo for a fake meat place.
Cuts of pork and Helvetica. Industrial.

Also there were these labels to put onto boxes:

Lickin' Pete'sLes Rogatons LabelTMC LabelAnd, although it never made it into the film (and granted, it needed a bit more touching to work) there was the logo for a fake farm where the evil hell smartpork was harvested:

Hayman Farms

As I hope I’ve made abundantly clear, this was a fantastic project to be a part of and please keep your eyes open for it in a theater near you (I heard that it may be getting a European Tour, so watch out Paris and Minsk!), and I’ll certainly let my seven readers know when Pig Death Machine is available online.

100 Science Fictions

  1. Space Crisis on Planet Helmar

  2. Greygax the Horrible

  3. It Came from 5 Places

  4. Don’t Look at It!

  5. I Have Space-Sickies

  6. Robot with Mallet

  7. The Monster from Pluto’s Moon

  8. Urion

  9. Capricia

  10. The Lowest Point

  11. Stanley Spaceman: Man in SPACE!

  12. Mars is Puce

  13. Hyraxi!

  14. Uh-Oh, Asteroid

  15. The Stock Crash of Fortuna

  16. Planet Without a Face

  17. The Saddest Belt

  18. Mantis!

  19. Remus V: Planet of Wretch

  20. KRAAG

  21. C.C.C.X

  22. Stanley Spaceman in Jungle Trouble… IN SPACE!

  23. His Eyes Were Gone

  24. Lof the Greedy

  25. Zzzzzappp

  26. Zapf: Dingbat from Space

  27. The Tromper of Delubina

  28. Justise

  29. Tortoise of Terror

  30. GIF, GIF, GIF!

  31. The Incredible Moron

  32. Death Isn’t on the Moon

  33. Stanely Spaceman and the Case of the Martian Mirror

  34. Ghosts of Yesterday’s Past

  35. A City of Unrest

  36. The Jewel of Forever

  37. Not This Time

  38. Fear of Stars

  39. A.R.C.S and L.E.A.D

  40. The Forgotten Workday

  41. If the Moon Could Dance

  42. Hitler was a Space Robot from Saturn’s Past

  43. #ROBOTOHNOOHPLEASE

  44. Stanely Spaceman Can’t Find It.

  45. Cybermonday

  46. “The Goo”, It Said

  47. Martian Ragweed

  48. Tyler is Gone

  49. IT DOESN’T WORK

  50. The Giant Reef Monster

  51. Nibbles the Unrelenting

  52. Iron Cast

  53. The Looming Cloud

  54. The Twin of Janus

  55. A Bead of Six: A Stanley Spaceman Tale

  56. Error of Infinity

  57. Not Again This Time

  58. *See Appendix

  59. The Fire of 1000 Suns

  60. “I Can See the Future, Captain”

  61. I FORGOT THE KEYS!

  62. Curiosity’s Folly

  63. It Was Right There

  64. You Won’t Like It

  65. The Longest 10

  66. Stanley Spaceman has a Problem

  67. Steam-Powered Monster Brains Attack the Pentagon!

  68. The Creeping Time

  69. But, Why?

  70. The Look of Galf

  71. The Year of Ice

  72. There’s too Many!

  73. Yesterday’s Tomorrow

  74. It Sneezes

  75. The Cats of Forever

  76. Green Gooses!

  77. Stanley Spaceman Makes a Friend

  78. Crazy Enough

  79. Lorem: The Always Planet

  80. Lights of Mars

  81. Samuel?

  82.  /ERROR/

  83. The Monster Needs to Eat

  84. Unidentified but See-Through

  85. Zeron: Element of the Void

  86. Woman of Sad Eternities

  87. Horrible Things

  88. Stanley Spaceman’s Space-Egg from Outer Space!

  89. I Can’t Hear It

  90. Don’t Look Now, But It’s Here

  91. Robot Needs an Outlet

  92. Anger of Deos

  93. Beige and Marooned: Lisa in Space

  94. Helmets of Crius VI

  95. Steel Heart, Living Lungs

  96. The Green Also Grows

  97. K.O.R.P.S.Es

  98. The Gears of the Martian Revolution

  99. The Death of Stanley Spaceman: An Earthling’s Tale

  100. “It Can’t Be”, Said the Moon.